Brexit indicative votes

In an attempt to break the impasse that exists in Parliament following the rejection – three times and by historic margins – of the Government’s flawed Brexit deal, MPs have twice taken control of the parliamentary order paper and held indicative votes on a range of alternatives.

After careful thought and consideration, and taking into account the views conveyed to me by a significant number of constituents, I voted as follows in the first round of indicative voting on Wednesday 27 March:

I voted for:

  • (D) – Common Market 2.0: Remaining in the Single Market and seeking a temporary customs union with the EU;
  • (J) – A permanent, comprehensive UK-wide customs union with the EU;
  • (K) – Labour’s alternative Brexit proposal: a permanent, comprehensive UK-wide customs union with the EU, close alignment with the Single Market, dynamic alignment on rights and protections, clear commitments on participation in EU agencies and funding programmes, and unambiguous agreements on the detail of future security arrangements;
  • (L) – Revoking Article 50 to avoid a ‘no deal’ exit; and
  • (M) – A confirmatory public vote on a deal approved by Parliament (also known as the Kyle-Wilson amendment).

I voted against:

  • (B) – A ‘no deal’ Brexit
  • (H) – Membership of EFTA and the EEA without any form of customs union; and
  • (O) – A standstill arrangement seeking a tariff-free trade agreement with the EU that will last for two years.

In the second round of indicative voting on Monday 1 April I voted for:

  • (C) – A permanent and comprehensive UK-wide customs union with the EU as a minimum;
  • (D) – Common Market 2.0: Remain in the Single Market and seek a temporary customs union with the EU;
  • (E) – A confirmatory public vote; and
  • (G) – Revoking Article 50 to avoid a ‘no deal’ exit if a further extension does not prove possible.